×

Write an article Log In Registration
  • Hybrid and electric supercars

     



     



    Hybrid and electric supercars have become more common in recent years; from models you can buy today to limited-edition rarities on their way to classic status



    by Driving Electric



    23 Feb 2021



    Regera



    If you love cars and driving, then you’ve probably spent hours dreaming about supercars at one time or another. There’s a whole new generation of these ultimate sports cars now, as hybrid and electric power starts taking over the new-car market.



    It’s hard to define a supercar exactly, but it’s not too hard to come up with a rough outline. The main thing with a supercar is that it has to look dramatic. Supercars are usually very low, with flowing bodywork, two doors and all kinds of air intakes and spoilers to add to the sporting image. Not everyone loves how they look, but it would be hard to argue that they don’t stand out from the crowd.





    The other thing supercars have in common is incredible performance. These cars are built to be fantastic to drive above all else, so they tend to have astonishing levels of acceleration and in many cases are capable of over 200mph. Electric supercars tend to use beefy motors on each wheel to give maximum performance and achieve 0-62mph times that are barely believable, while hybrid supercars tend to use a much smaller motor to provide some extra muscle while the internal-combustion engine does most of the heavy lifting.



    Advertisement



    Advertisement - Article continues below



    All the major supercar makers are getting involved in electric and hybrid supercars, so we’ve stuck to the big names for this list of the best ones. There are several smaller car makers such as Rimac that are making all-electric supercars, but a brand with a history of quality and in some cases motorsport success is more appealing, so we’ve stuck to marques like Ferrari and Porsche. Yet we've not only chosen top-of-the-line supercars that you have to be filthy rich to afford. We’ve also included some models that you can find on the secondhand market at an affordable price, to get a taste of what these cars are like without the eye-watering price tag.



    Ferrari SF90



    Ferrari SF90 Stradale



    The Ferrari SF90 Stradale is the Italian brand’s current flagship model, and as you’d expect it is an astonishing technical achievement. It uses a 4.0-litre turbocharged V8 engine with three electric motors to create a combined power output of 987bhp. It wasn’t long ago that the 1,000bhp mark was only achievable with some serious compromise and expense but the SF90 is designed to be driven regularly, on public roads. It goes from 0-62mph in just 2.5 seconds and on to a top speed of 211mph.



    Advertisement



    Advertisement - Article continues below



    Related Videos



    New 2021 Lexus UX 300e electric SUV review – DrivingElectric






    • video playing


      New 2021 Lexus UX 300e electric SUV review – DrivingElectric




    • New 2021 MG 5 SW EV electric estate car review...



      14/09/21


      New 2021 MG 5 SW EV electric estate car review – DrivingElectric




    • New 2021 Kia EV6 electric car prototype drive –...



      06/09/21


      New 2021 Kia EV6 electric car prototype drive – DrivingElectric




    • New 2021 BMW i4 electric car – all you need to...



      17/08/21


      New 2021 BMW i4 electric car – all you need to know – DrivingElectric




    • New 2021 Hyundai Ioniq 5 electric car review –...



      10/08/21


      New 2021 Hyundai Ioniq 5 electric car review – DrivingElectric




    • New 2021 Audi e-tron GT review: the four-door...



      03/08/21


      New 2021 Audi e-tron GT review: the four-door electric supercar – DrivingElectric




    Perhaps even more astonishing is its 0-124mph (200kph) time, which is 6.7 seconds. That means it is going at double the speed of your average hot hatch in the same amount of time from a standing start. Its all-electric range is 15 miles, and you can even get up to 85mph on the motors alone - but the engine will kick in seamlessly if you give the throttle a kick, or the battery runs out.



    Honda NSX



    Honda NSX



    The Honda NSX is one to keep your eye on. The original model used a V6 petrol engine only and was unloved for many years, and prices dropped well into affordable territory. Yet today, it’s one of the most sought-after cars of its type. The same could happen to the 2016-on model, which uses a V6 petrol and three electric motors.



    it  go from 0-62mph in 2.9 seconds and reach a top speed of 191mph, thanks to the power output of 573bhp. As the NSX isn’t a plug-in hybrid, the battery is pretty small and it’s not easy to extract good fuel economy from it, but as an exciting driver’s car the NSX is superb.



    BMW i8



    BMW i8



    The BMW i8 is the cheapest car on this list by some margin, as if you head to the classifieds you can find models that are cheaper than a new hot hatchback. Yet this dramatic-looking BMW is every bit a supercar in our book – it even has the eyebrow-raising upwards-opening doors.



    Advertisement



    Advertisement - Article continues below



    It’s not the sharpest supercar to drive, but it’s incredibly usable every day because it feels like a BMW saloon to drive. That’s no bad thing, as it’s a lot of fun but also comfortable and relaxing on the motorway.



    It uses an unusual powertrain – a 1.5-litre three-cylinder petrol engine and an electric motor. That’s unheard of in the supercar world but performance is still impressive: 0-62mph takes 4.4 seconds thanks to the power output of 369bhp in total. It’s quick because the car is largely built using carbon fibre, so it’s very light.



    Porsche Taycan



    Porsche Taycan Turbo S



    The Porsche Taycan range includes several different models, but the Turbo S is the flagship car and if its performance is anything to go by, it’s a supercar for sure. It’s certainly got the dramatic looks, but the 0-62mph time of 2.8 seconds cements its place here. The electric-only Taycan Turbo S has an output of 751bhp and can go up to 162mph, all while emitting no tailpipe emissions at all. The maximum range of 256 miles means it’s able to match some petrol supercars’ driving range, thanks to their thirsty engines.



    With over 1,000Nm of torque, the Taycan is savagely quick in a straight line but it’s also good to drive thanks to its low centre of gravity, as the battery is stored low in the chassis. As the Taycan is Porsche’s flagship electric car at the moment it’s also designed to be great for long trips, with a pleasant cabin filled with the latest tech.



    Ferrari LaFerrari



    Ferrari LaFerrari



    First seen in 2013, the Ferrari LaFerrari was our first look at a new generation of electrified supercars. It was highly exclusive, costing over a million pounds when new. The LaFerrari used a 6.3-litre V12 petrol engine and a Formula 1-derived ‘KERS’ electric motor that combined for a total output of 950bhp. Its top speed was over 217mph and 0-62mph took less than three seconds. Remember, this was nearly a decade ago – all the more impressive that it matches the very latest hybrid and electric supercars.



    Advertisement



    Advertisement - Article continues below



    All sorts of technology was used to make the LaFerrari into something even more than a supercar – we began to call it a hypercar. Carbon-fibre construction, active aerodynamics, an electronic differential and adjustable suspension were all present. It was part of a trio of hybrid hypercars that also included the McLaren P1 and Porsche 918 Spyder, as the big supercar manufacturers began their exploration into electric power in a performance application.



    McLaren P1



    McLaren P1



    The Mclaren P1 was the British answer to the LaFerrari (above), as it had a similar goal: to be the ultimate driver’s car that used both petrol and electric power. It cost close to £900,000 when it launched, and was seen as the follow-up to the legendary McLaren F1 of the 1990s.



    The P1 used a carbon-fibre construction like all McLaren road cars at this point, so weighed around 1,400kg, which is less than most family cars. The 3.8-litre V8 engine is turbocharged and has electric motors that help it to produce a total of 986bhp. 



    This means it can go from 0-62mph in under three seconds and from 0-124mph (200kph) in under seven seconds. You can go for about six miles on electricity alone in the P1, but it can actually go up to 100mph in electric-only mode. Clever suspension meant that it was a true driver’s car and as exciting to drive as it was to look at.



    Porsche 918



    Porsche 918 Spyder



    The final of the three hybrid hypercars from the early 2010s, the Porsche 918 Spyder was also the cheapest – but in many ways, that made it even more impressive. It cost over £600,000 when new, so hardly a cheap runabout, but it had the performance to take on the other two heavyweights. It used a 4.6-litre V8 petrol engine with its two electric motors, which produce a total of 875bhp. The petrol motor alone makes nearly 600bhp, and the battery provides an all-electric range of 18 miles. The motor can drive at up to 93mph without the engine even turning on.



    Advertisement



    Advertisement - Article continues below



    Performance was stunning, then: 0-62mph took just 2.6 seconds, and 0-124mph took 7.2 seconds. The 918 Spyder’s top speed was 214mph, so it was only a little behind the claimed figures of the LaFerrari and the P1 (above). The Porsche has an extra factor up its sleeve over the Ferrari and McLaren, in that it’s four-wheel drive rather than rear-wheel drive, which gives it that extra traction off the line.



    Mercedes SLS Electric Drive



    Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG Electric Drive



    The Mercedes SLS AMG was a stunning supercar launched in 2010, but it was V8-only for the most part, with no electricity involved in the powertrain. However, in 2013 Mercedes showed the world that an electric supercar could really be done.



    The SLS AMG Electric Drive was the result, and while it had a very limited production run, it proved to the world that you don’t need a petrol engine for a supercar. It used four electric motors with a total output of 739bhp and had a range of 155 miles on a single charge.



    The SLS AMG Electric Drive stood out thanks to the vibrant high-vis-jacket yellow that it was promoted with, as well as its dramatic gullwing doors. It went from 0-62mph in just 3.9 seconds, which wasn’t bad considering that it weighed 560kg more than the petrol-powered model, at 2,110kg in total.



    Rimac



    Rimac Concept One



    The Rimac Automobili Concept One was launched in 2017 and proved that it wasn’t just the old guard that could make an impressive electric supercar. It used four electric motors, which together produced an astonishing 1,073bhp. That means it was able to go from 0-62mph in just 2.6 seconds and on to a top speed of 221mph. A range of 200 miles was apparently possible if you didn’t indulge in the performance too much.



    It used special technology to achieve these astonishing figures, including an actual gearbox with different ratios to improve acceleration (most electric cars use a single-speed setup). It also used technology to control the motors on each wheel individually to improve handling.



    Regera



    Koenigsegg Regera



    Koenigsegg is a big name in the world of highly exclusive supercars and the Regera was its 2016 hybrid model that brought some pretty amazing numbers. It used a 5.0-litre turbocharged V8 petrol engine and three electric motors, which produced a combined output of over 1,480bhp and over 2,000Nm of torque. As the Regera weighs only 1,590kg, it’s one of the quickest hybrid supercars around. 0-62mph takes around 2.8 seconds and its top speed is said to be over 250mph.



    It can go from 0-124mph in an astonishing 6.6 seconds and from 0-186mph in 10.9 seconds. That’s right – the Regera is nearing the 200mph barrier in the same amount of time as it takes a city car to go from 0-62mph. In 2019, the Regera became the fastest car in the world to go from 0–249–0 mph (0–400–0 km/h), which took it just 31.49 seconds.


  • This Street-Legal Porsche Prototype Started Life as a Le Man

    1991 Porsche Koenig Specials C62Issimi



    You could soon own a street-legal version of the car that helped Porsche own endurance racing during the ‘80s and early ‘90s.



     



    An ultra-rare 1991 Porsche Koenig Specials C62 was just listed for sale on Issimi. The outrageous-looking speed machine may not be in mint condition, but it’s hard to think of a better car in which to recreate the feeling of racing at Le Mans.



     



     



    Porsche racers took home the top prize at the 24 Hours of Le Mans every year from 1981 and 1987. Much of this dominance can be traced to two cars, the 956 and its successor, the 962. Although the 962 didn’t take home as many checkered flags at the race as its predecessor (the 956 was responsible for four wins, and the 962 claimed two), it was a genuine force until rule changes brought its time to an end. With its racing days behind it, Porsche let a handful of companies, including Koenig, convert the remaining 962 prototypes for street use.



     



     



    1991 Porsche Koenig Specials C62



    Koening, the German tuner, has a tendency to take a high-performance vehicle like the Ferrari Testarosa and make it even more extreme. And sure enough, that’s exactly what the shop did with the C62. Although it looks identical to the race car, it was completely re-engineered for street driving and to meet German government regulations, according to the listing. In fact, there is not a single shared body panel between the two vehicles.



    1991 Porsche Koenig Specials C62



    Inside the Porsche Koenig Specials C62 Issimi



    Underneath the C62’s rear-positioned engine lid, you’ll find a 3.4-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six. That mill is mated to a five-speed manual transmission that sends power to the rear axle and can generate 550 hp, a number that was verified as recently as 2019. The car’s suspension has been completely redone and fitted with softer springs and dampers, while its racing-style brakes now feature more street-oriented pads.



    1991 Porsche Koenig Specials C62



    1991 Porsche Koenig Specials C62 Issimi



    Koenig had dreams of building 30 C62s, but only ended up producing three, of which this is the second. Since being completed in 1992, it’s spent much of its time in Japan, where it passed through a number of collector’s hands. Its current owner purchased it in 2019 and had it imported to the US. It’s been well-maintained and has just 1,555 miles on the odometer but, as Jalopnik points out, its body hasn’t been restored, which means there are some signs of wear and tear, like scrapes and chips.



    1991 Porsche Koenig Specials C62



     



    Most surprising of all about this listing is the price tag: $995,000. While certainly not accessible, it’s less than the $1,030,000 the car cost brand new (which would be over $2 million in today’s money). It’s hard to call a car with a high-six-figure sticker price a bargain, but this actually might be just that.


  • In Search of the Best Golf Magazine – Our Top 10

    What golfer doesn’t enjoy picking up a good golf magazine? But with all the options out there it’s easy to find yourself buried under a mountain of pro news and interviews, behind the scenes action, game improvement tips, golf equipment reviews, and tons of other golf content.



    To help organize this media blast we sorted through the news racks in search of the best golf magazine and narrowed our list down to what we believe are the top 10 “best of the best” in this expanding industry.



    Golf Digest - Best Golf Magazine1. Golf Digest



    In our (and many others’) option, Golf Digest is the cream of the crop when it comes to golf publications. Golf Digest uses its well-established reputation to bring readers exclusive instruction from some of the world’s top professional players and guarantees that content will help you play better golf. Issues are published monthly with subscriptions coming in at roughly $19.99 for the year ($1.67 per issue). Keep this in mind around birthdays and holidays because it makes for a great gift for your fellow golfers (or yourself). Plus, you’d be crazy not to check out Golficity’s Hottest Girl in Golf for 2013 Holly Sonders’ spread.



    Golf Magazine - Best Golf Magazine2. Golf Magazine



    Golf Magazine follows closely behind Golf Digest in its outstanding ability to provide golf instruction, features, TOUR coverage, reviews of new equipment, articles on golf travel and interviews with the pros. We recommend this publication for golfers of all skill levels and the featured instruction from the top 100 teachers in America is often broken down to provide insights for every handicap. Golf Magazine is also well known for surveying and ranking the best courses in the world (major drool factor here).



    Golf World - Best Golf Magazine3. Golf World



    If you’re looking to receive your golf content more often than once a month Golf World might be the choice for you. This weekly publication provides comprehensive coverage of the PGA, LPGA, Champions, Nationwide and International Tours. Each issue of Golf World magazine is loaded with player stats, news, interviews and analysis.



    4. Golf Tips



    Golf Tips - Best Golf Magazines



    On the opposite end of the spectrum from GolfWorld is Golf Tips Magazine which offers only 7 issues throughout the calendar year but each issue is jam-packed with content. As a reader, you’ll be given in-depth golfing instruction for golfers of all skill levels. Every issue of Golf Tips magazine is loaded with expert advice from the world’s top pros, equipment guides and course information. Grab this magazine for an excellent value at just $12 bucks dollars for a full year.



    5. Golfweek



    Golf Week - Best Golf Magazine



    Golfweek magazine is a another weekly publication that is said to “enhance the enjoyment and understanding of golf” by applying high standards of journalism to cover the sport. We love Golfweek magazine for its steady stream of up-to-date golf information about competition, business and the golf lifestyle. It’s a great way to stay updated on the rapidly changing landscape of today’s golf world. At about $40 for the year you’ll pay a bit more for this one but if you like to have plenty of golf content in rapid succession, this one is for you.



    6. LINKS Magazine



    LINKS - Best Golf MagazineLINKS magazine tends to target passionate, affluent golfers. LINKS covers the game’s best personalities, all major championships, and provides reviews of new and high-performance equipment. The magazine also focuses heavily on golf course reviews, and the best travel (and most luxurious) destinations to play the game. Don’t expect much frequency with this one as you’ll only receive 5 issues over the course of 12 months, but for just under $12.00 for the year it’s a nice addition to your office or home coffee table.



    7. Kingdom Magazine



    Kingdom - Best Golf MagazineKingdom Magazine is a more unique golf magazine that comes with a bit higher price tag. Brought to you by the “King” himself, Arnold Palmer, this publication is delivered to you 3 times per year. This high end golf magazine offers editorial content and photography of the highest caliber and often written by some of the best known names in golf journalism. You can grab a year’s subscription here for about $48.



    8. Golf Monthly



    Golf Monthly - Best Golf MagazineFor United States readers, Golf Monthly is probably the most expensive popular print golf magazine on the market today (a staggering $200 for 12 issues, most of which we’re sure is shipping charges). At about £45.99 per year the price is much more manageable for readers in the UK. The magazine includes tips, drills and advice from the UK’s Top 25 coaches and the leading names on TOUR. Similar to others, Golf Monthly also spends a good deal of its content reviewing the best and latest golf gear. Often unofficially touted as a complete guide to golfing, Golf Monthly is overall a bit pricey here in the States, but certainly worth a read.



    9. Today’s Golfer



    Today's Golfer - Best Golf MagazineLike Golf Monthly Today’s Golfer is another UK based golf publication providing information on playing better, buying better gear, and choosing better courses to play. The content is solid and the imagery in the magazine itself is second-to-none but we found that their website format leaves a bit to be desired. This publication is also a bit pricey for those of us State-side (a bit north of $100 for 13 issues over 12 months) but the same subscription is only around £49.00 overseas.



    10. Golf International UK



    Golf International - Best Golf MagazineWe’ve heard critics claim that Golf International UK is the “authoritative magazine in the golfing world” and although we don’t think it’s up to snuff with our top three, it’s still certainly one of the premier golf publications coming out of the UK. Like the others, this magazine features interviews with the top names in golf but what we really like is that it also offers a dedicated business section that includes columns within a golfing context on people, shares, betting, property, cars and memorabilia. This is another pricey publication which can cost you close to $80 for 6 issues over 12 months in the U.S. or £39.99 for 8 issues in England but  its also worth picking up a copy especially if you’re on that side of the pond.



    Did we miss any of your favorite golf magazines?  Leave us a comment below and let us know which golf publications would make your own top 10 list.


  • Golf Supercars Italian beasts

    Golf SupercarsItalian beasts



    OWEN HIGGINS



    Lambhorghini Gallardo



    Out-and-out performance cars are generally something you see a professional footballer drive but there are growing amount of ‘piston-heads’ among the golfing fraternity. Traditionally these beasts have barely had enough room for an overnight bag, so the Pro’s had their caddy chauffeur their clubs to the course. Now things have moved on with manufacturers catering specifically to golfers. Most of these beautiful modern machines can accommodate a set of clubs, it’s also no surprise at this top end of the market there are a number of tie-ins between supercar manufacturers and equipment manufacturers. Lamborghini and Calloway are collaborating on carbon fiber technology to improve both cars and clubs. Ferrari and Cobra have collaborated on a high-end range of clubs and accessories with current F1 champion Fernando Alonzo appearing on their marketing material. It is definitely an area that goes hand-in-hand together. We are going to take a look at a selection of dream cars and see how they fair.



    Lambhorghini Gallardo LP 570-4 Superleggera



    ¥29,200,000



    Lambhorghini Gallardo LP 570-4 Superleggera



    The raging bull of Italian supercar manufacturers never fails to deliver when it comes to jaw dropping performance. Their cars have long been ahead of their time in terms of futuristic styling and have always had an ’Out of this world’ appeal. When the Countach appeared in 1974, it looked like nothing else on the roads and went on to become a trend setter among manufacturers.



    The current model Gallardo was Lamborghini’s first venture into a mass produced ‘every day’ supercar than their range topping line. It has been in produc- tion for nearly 10 years and has been through numerous improvements and updates. This current LP 570-4 Superleggera model represents the closest to racecar performance of all Gallardo models to date. Extensive use of carbon fiber in the construction has managed to save 70 killogrammes over the standard model. These savings added to the beefed-up 570 horse power V10 engine propel the car from 0 to 100kmh in 3.4 seconds, and on- wards to a top speed of 325 km/h.

    All of that with a half full golf bag easily tucked behind the front seats.



    Maserati Gran Turismo MC Stradale



    ¥21,125,000



    Maserati Gran Turismo MC Stradale



    Maserati have always been the slightly more under- stated and refined of the Italian Sipercar manufacturers.

    The company has been around almost 100 years, but during that time they have been bought and sold quite a bit while it struggled to find its feet, all the while producing fantastic and iconic cars. Their current stable run has brought some of their best cars to date.



    Maserati Gran Turismo MC Stradale



    This Gran Turismo MC Stradale shares its platform with its bigger brother Quattroporte but is currently the lightest and most powerful car in the Maserati range. It also has the most spacious trunk space of the supercars, large enough to accommodate two golf bags.

    For a car that boasts a 4.5 second 0 to 100kmh time and with such striking good looks that sets it quite apart from the competition in our sporting niche. This model like the previous Lamborghini is the closest version to a track going racecar that they produce.

    Unnecessary extras have been stripped away to leave this purest form. This car is just as comfortable on the way to a mountain Golf Club as it is around the corners of the Fuji Speedway.



    Ferrari California 30



    ¥25,600,000



    Ferrari California 30



    The only convertible hard top in the group, the Ferrari is almost out on it’s own in this group being the newest model by a few years as well as being a stand alone new model in the Ferrari range. The 30 in this models moniker stands for the car being 30% lighter as well as having 30% more power than the original release. As you can imagine the California is everything you have been led to expect from the eighty years old prestige marquee.



    Ferrari California 30



    The only convertible hard top in the group, the Ferrari is almost out on it’s own in this group being the newest model by a few years as well as being a stand alone new model in the Ferrari range. The 30 in this models moniker stands for the car being 30% lighter as well as having 30% more power than the original release. As you can imagine the California is everything you have been led to expect from the eighty years old prestige marquee.


  • FRASER - The home of luxury yachts

    Discover over 70 years of experience offered by our yacht brokerage teams of over 170 people, speaking more than 25 different languages with yacht brokers in 17 locations worldwide and specialists in over 50 key luxury yachting services covering every aspect of yacht ownership, yacht sales, yacht charter, yacht construction, yacht management and crew placement.


First page Ads:

First Page

Advertising
First Page

Advertising
First Page

Advertising
First Page

Advertising
First Page

Advertising
First Page

Advertising
First Page

Advertising
First Page

Advertising
First Page

Advertising
First Page

Advertising